Tag Archives: Ruby

Stick or Twist: The programming language dilemma

27 Sep
Stick or Twist?

Stick or Twist?

My blog post yesterday about the difficulties of finding a technical co-founder generated a lot of good discussion over at Hacker News.

Something that was frequently mentioned was an issue that I have also been wrestling with: whether or not to stick with the original language that Satago was built with.

Satago was built with Java, using the Tapestry framework. I knew that if/when it came to looking for a tech co-founder, and potential employees, it would be more difficult to find Java developers than, say, PhP or Ruby developers. Many Java developers are currently working in banking or big enterprise platforms, which pays very well, whereas PhP developers are much more common in web startups, and Ruby-on-Rails is currently much more trendy (as is Nodejs).

By only looking for Java guys as potential co-founders I am restricting my pool of potential founders. I’ve always said that for the right co-founder I would not mind to switch language, but at the same time if the site is already in Java, it would be a shame to start from scratch in other language.

This subject does seem to neatly polarise opinion amongst my developer friends, and the people that commented on the Hacker News thread:

The two camps are:

(Paraphrasing collective opinions) “You’d be mad to change programming language now. The site is well built, the code is good, and Java is a great language for you to scale with the sort of application you’re going to build. Wait for the right guy, they will come along. “

and

“Honestly, I think your biggest problem is Java, it’s just not going to hit a large enough cross section of 20/30 year olds, that want to take a risk, that are into tech.”

“That should be the least of your concerns. Finding a co-founder is hard enough without expecting him to know Java. Pick based on other criteria, then let him rebuild it as he sees fit. There’s a good chance that even a Java guy would end up refactoring it beyond recognition. It’s exactly what I would do.”

As a non-technical guy, I’m not really in a good position to judge the technical merits of Java vs. not Java.

What do you think – stick or twist?